Friday, November 21, 2008

I PR'D my deadlift today by 30#. I lifted 165#.
Ok so I wasn't the only one, Carl lifted 340 and pr'd and Jacob lifted 420. We all were super happy way to go boys. And thanks Freddy for coaching us.


WOD 11/21/2008


Deadlift 1-1-1-1-1

Freddy, Jacob, Catra and Carl.

The Importance of Deadlifts
and Proper Deadlift Form


If your aim is to pack on as much muscle mass as possible, deadlifts are your best friend. In this article we explain the importance of this great exercise and also proper deadlift form.

So what makes deadlifts so great? Along with barbell squats, the deadlift is one of the most effective weight lifting exercises you can possibly have in your workout routine.

They require huge amounts of strength and energy to perform, and will stress your entire body like no other lift. The main muscles worked during deadlifts are the lower back, upper back, and your thighs, but they will also work almost every other muscle group you have so you will see muscle gains everywhere.

Also, just as with doing squats, performing heavy deadlifts will force your body to produce extra growth hormone and testosterone since they stress the body so much (this is a good thing). This will increase your strength levels on other exercises such as the bench press and barbell row.

So if they are so good for you, why isn't everybody in the gym deadlifting? Simple put, they are perhaps the most uncomfortable and painful exercise to perform. They requrie a lot of willpower and dicipline. Just like with doing squats, people will make excuses to steer clear of including the deadlift in their routine.

Those with the determination to achieve the best muscle building results will do deadlifts without hesitation, and learn the proper deadlift technique. You simply won't get the same muscle building results without them in your arsenal.


Proper Deadlift Form

Ok, here I will explain how you should be performing deadlifts correctly. There's a few different variations of the deadlift, but I will be explaining how to perform a standard, bent-legged deadlift.

Before starting, place the barbell on the ground. Stand in front of the bar with your shins as close to the bar as possible. Your feet should be roughly shoulder width apart.

Grip the bar about shoulder width apart. You can grip it with either an overhand grip, or an alternate grip with one palm facing out and the other palm facing in. Choose whichever is more comfortable to you.

Get into a squat position and make sure the bar is close to your shins. Now, whilst keeping your back as flat as possible, your abs tight, and your head looking upwards, lift the bar up off the ground by pushing with your legs. This is important, lift with your legs, not your back!

You should lift the bar up like this until you are in a standing position. Here's a tip: when lifting the weight up, think of pushing your heels through the floor.

Ok now that you are standing with the bar, lower it back down to the starting squat position by following the same path as when you lifted it up.

You can rest the bar on the ground for a second or two, and then lift it up back up again. Repeat this until you get to your desired number of reps or until your deadlift form starts to slip. Don't continue with poor form because you have a high chance of injury, especially if the weight is heavy.

You need to be careful with deadlifts, a lot of back injuries occur with lifters doing them with poor form. It's absolutely critical that you exercise with good deadlift technique, otherwise you will be out of the gym and into a wheelchair in no time!

When you're just starting out with the exercise, or practicing your form, remember to use light weights. When you begin to get the hang of good deadlift form, then you can start lifting heavier weights.

If I had to repeat something to you about correct deadlift technique, it would be:

Always remember to keep your back flat, abs tight, and look upwards.

You may be wondering how many sets you should do and how often you should do them. I would recommend that you perform deadlifts once a week. 2-3 heavy sets should do the trick for you. Remember to do a few warm-up sets with a light weight first, and you might want to add some streching before and after too.

Now you understand the importance of the deadlift, and you know the proper deadlift form, you have no excuses not to add them to your weight training routine. You will be able to pack on more muscle mass than ever before!

All is evolution, all is cyclical, therefore endings lead to new beginnings. You cannot begin without an end. If you cannot let go of the past then the past constantly recreates itself. Look now to the future and the paths to your goals will again become clear. Obstacles or limitations will be surmounted and lost or forgotten opportunities will again be presented. Success is now within your grasp but realise that to maximise that success new ways, or new methods, could make life so much easier.
© Stephen Haynes

6 comments:

Joe said...

420! whoo hoo!

Mikey Mike said...

Nice Job Catra... 30lbs.......that's huge!!!!

Mike

Erin said...

Hi Catra:

Have you every blogged in depth about how you integrate CF with your running? I've read the CF endurance page, but it's a bit sparse. Do you really race on CF plus the CFE WODS? No long runs? Or? If you have blogged about it, I'd love to read it!

Best,
Erin

Jonah said...

Love that mean look in the deadlift photo!

Any thoughts on barefoot lifting? I’ve been doing some barefoot squats lately and I like it but am concerned about over stressing my Achilles.

Steve Stenzel said...

I gotta try deadlifts.

I ran 1600 repeats at the track today (in the snow) and then I dropped down and did a Crossfit-esque workout right there on the snowy, cold track. Check it out:

http://iwannagetphysical.blogspot.com/

AND THEN I came home and did "21" (but I cheated on a few). Have a good weekend!

Tsypkin said...

Catra, training with you and Carl was awesome. You guys are more than welcome to come train at CF Monterey any time you want.

-Jacob
www.crossfit-monterey.com